Category Archives: Announcements

Thu. Nov. 22, 2018: Planning the upper half of the landscape at Politecnico di Milano with the BuioMetria Partecipativa project

Thursday, Nov. 22, 2018 from 2.30PM to 3.30PM with the landscape planning  course at the Faculty of Architecture, Politecnico di Milano (via Bonardi),  there will be a seminar on  Planning the “upper half of the landscape” (pianificare l’altra metà del paesaggio, in Italian) where we will explain the BuioMetria Partecipativa point of view on this topic. The lecture will be given in English (as all of the course lectures).
This is not the first time that BuioMetria Partecipativa goes to Politecnico (2011, 2014, 2015, 2017), nor is it the first time that we speak to architects (2014, Summer School in Porto). However this is the first time that we speak to architects from Politecnico, and for a Politecnico MS Engineer (and PhD) this is news.
As I think of it, actually it is not even the first time in this respect. The Politecnico Architecture Faculty hosted the final event of the m(‘)appare Milano campaign (a localized version of an OpenStreetMap mapping party), which interestingly happened in the same months when the BuioMetria Partecipativa project was being written. You may check this page on m(‘)appare and this video for a coverage of the first round of the mapping campaign (Apr. 6, 2008).
The closing of the m(‘)appare Milano campaign at the Faculty of Architecture, Politcnico di Milano (Jul. 3, 2008)
Independently of open data nostalgia (or the sense of putting a project in a perspective) please see below the abstract for next week’s seminar. Should you not be able to attend, but interested in learning more about these topics or sharing your views, please write to bmp@pibinko.org.
Planning the Upper Half of the Landscapa – A. Giacomelli
Montemassi Castle, Southern Tuscany, with the Milky Way and some populated places – F. Giussani 2015.

People are often used to think of landscape planning as a discipline involving elements with a connection to the ground, with the sky being merely a backdrop to our projects and our operations.

However, at night, lighting networks and installations have an impact on the conditions of night sky which is not only aesthetic (i.e. the reduction of our ability to contemplate a starry sky due to the excess of upward lighting), but also has significant impacts on ecology, astronomy, health and safety, and energy management.
In this respect, the night sky as “the upper half of the landscape” acquires an unprecedented relevance, and suggests planning indications that we can relate to elements we control on the ground.
Interestingly, we will find that mitigation actions on light pollution are not in conflict with lighting levels ensuring safety and security, and that a higher awareness on the effects of artificial light at night will indicate new directions on guidelines and regulations, which planners may want to consider.
While such an awareness has been growing over the past twenty years, lighting installations are also changing very fast, and possibly not always in a direction which is in tune with recent research findings on the effects of artificial light a night. For this reason, there is a need to strengthen an interdisciplinary approach on the topic.
The talk will provide:
(1) an overview of the light pollution issue and measures to mitigate it from various angles
(2) a series of ideas on the sustainable exploitation of night skies as a resource for tourism and education
(3) the presentation of experiences by the speaker’s team, where students may also be involved in 2019.
……
Andrea Giacomelli, PhD in Hydrology (1997), MS in Environmental Engineering (1993)
After his academic studies (Politecnico di Milano and University of Gent, Belgium), he worked for five years in the environmental modelling group at the Sardinia Science and Technology Park, for eight years for an environmental engineering corporation based in Milano, and since 2011 is operating as a free lance based in Southern Tuscany.
His activities cover a part of “traditional” services (primarily consulting on Geographic Information Systems and IT issues), and a part of innovative projects concerning the interdisciplinary promotion of lesser known resources, combining culture, environment, and open innovation.
His flagship initiative in the environmental sector is the BuioMetria Partecipativa project. Launched in 2008, this includes citizen science for night sky monitoring, outreach, and other efforts, primarily directed to the promotion of inner rural areas. Starting as a small community-based endeavour, the project has eventually triggered interesting developments, obtaining awards, frequent national media visibility, and de facto stimulating the birth of a national interdisciplinary network with significant international relations.
For more information:

Nov. 15, 2018 “Waiting for the Farma Valley Winter Fest” + BuioMetria @ Hotel Lombardi, Florence

Thursday, Nov. 15 from 6PM to 8PM at Hotel Lombardi in Florence(via Fiume, very close to S. Maria Novella train station), we will hold the first of a series of events to launch the Third Farma Valley Winter Fest (Dec. 14-16  see details).

In addition to providing a sneak peek on the festival, which is a melting pot promoting lesser know assets in the fields of culture, environment, and open innovation, there will be a focus on the  BuioMetria Partecipativa project, for the participatory monitoring of light pollution and night sky quality.

The event will be coordinate by Andrea Giacomelli, PhD, creator of the Winter Fest (and of the BuioMetria Partecipativa project), and co-hosted by Vincenzo Albanese.

Confirmation of your participation is appreciateb by Nov. 15, noon CET via e-mail to info@pibinko.org. The same address is valid for enquiries.

Dec. 14-16, 2018: 3rd Farma Valley Winter Fest, Southern Tuscany

We are finalizing the program for the Third Farma Valley Winter Fest.

This is an event connecting culture, environment, open innovation, and the Farma Valley, a lesser known location in Tuscany, South of Siena.

The festival has been created by a team, composed by professionals and local associations, who started in 2007 to promote rural areas in an interdisciplinary way. You may find a good introduction to our story in  this article from Langscape Magazine. You may also check out the sections of the pibinko.org site for other collateral information.

To get a feel for the two past editions of the Farma Valley Winter Fest you may also check some blog posts about the festival. For enquiries, or to send expressions of interest to be part of the Festival (helping out or proposing ideas): info@pibinko.org

Here’s a petition to the European Parliament on light pollution, for you to consider..

…and maybe sign.

Since 2008 with the BuioMetria Partecipativa project we work on protection and promotion of night sky as a resource and on awareness raising on light pollution.

Since 2013 we collaborate with various organisations in Europe on the same topics. Some of these organisations, currently active on the Stars4all project, have drafted a petition to the European Parliament, advocating a European Directive on light pollution.

With the BuioMetria Partecipativa project, in over eleven years we held almost 130 outreach events at various latitudes, obtained recurring national media coverage, conducted scientific activities, contributed to the creation of networks involving citizens, public and private sector organisations. Above all, we invited a lot of people to think about how much light (and which lights) they use. We are writing primarily to those who followed us on the events, and more in general to whoever is interested to the light pollution topic.

We encourage you to review the petition drafted by th Stars4all team. If you agree, sign it, and let us know you did (please write to bmp@pibinko.org). If you don’t agree with the petition, or you have any doubt, we would like to hear from you (again, write to bmp@pibinko.org).

 

Recommended steps

  1. Check out the full petition text
  2. Register on the European Parliament petition portal
  3. Once you have registered, log in to the petition portal, go to the petition page (look for n. 362/2018, or click here once you are logged in to go there directly) and click on the bottom right button to sign the petition.
  4. Write to bmp@pibinko.org to let us know how it went

European Parliament Petition No 0362/2018 on the possible adoption of European legislation against light pollution

The petition text was kindly provided by Sibylle Schroer from the Stars4all project – please see THIS PAGE for a presentation of the initiative related to the petition, which we translated into Italian for promotion by the BuioMetria Partecipativa project

The brightening of nightscapes is increasing globally by 2-6 % per annum with unforeseen
consequences for ecosystems and human well-being. The EU directives and norms, like the eco-design directive and the EN 13201 recommend to using most energy efficient light devices and providing a minimum brightness for certain classes of infrastructure. The sole focus on the factors energy efficiency and visual effectiveness will result in an increasing emission of blue light at night and even increase the rate of brightening of nightscapes. The lack of regulations for outdoor light installations can cause additional rebound effects, when efficient lighting becomes available at low cost. Today EU regulations on outdoor lighting lack scientific evidence for minimum and maximum light levels.

Furthermore, thresholds for non-intended light emission into habitat of flora and  fauna and into living areas are often complicated to be enforced. Manifold studies indicate that the ongoing waste and misuse of light, the so called light pollution,

affects human well-being and
health

threatens light sensitive species and their habitat, causing disruptions in ecosystems and loss of biodiversity

destroys nighttime landscapes and the cultural heritage of the starry night scape

is making the observation of the universe impossible.

Therefore, the EU standards on outdoor lighting stand in contradiction to the European legislation for the protection of the environment, the EU Environmental Liability Directive (Directive 2004/35/EC) and in particular the Habitats Directive (Council Directive 92/43/EEC).

We advocate:
• To regulate the maximal intensity for outdoor lighting and to support research in defining
scientifically justification for minimal illumination levels in public lighting standards (e.g. EN13201)
• To limit the light emission directed in the horizontal and above and in shallow downward angles
• To limit the exposure of bright light and particularly light with short wavelength, such as blue and UV-light.

Examples of comparable national / regional legislations within the EU:
• Law for the Protection of the Astronomical Quality of the IAC Observatories (Law 31/1988).
Slovenian national law against light pollution
French Order of 25 January 2013 relating to the night lighting of non-residential buildings in order to limit the light pollution and energy consumption
Regional Lombardy law against light pollution (2015)

Why do we need a European regulation of outdoor lighting?
• To protect citizens from lighting trespasses into their homes, which might have an impact on the circadian rhythm and consequently can increase the risk for health issues like insomnia, obesity and cancer.
• To reduce glare and thus improving safety in European infrastructures.
• To protect Europe’s natural capital and rich biodiversity.

• To support efforts to reach climate protection goals in reducing energy consumption and
associated pollution, carbon dioxide emissions and land-use changes associated with the production
of electricity.
• To protect astronomical viewing sites, for both professional and amateur astronomers.
• To promote the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Future Generations (UNESCO): “Future generations have the right to inherit an unharmed and unpolluted earth, and this includes the right to a pure sky.” (1994, Cousteau-UNESCO group).

More information: http://stars4all.eu/

==========================

Here’s a petition to the European Parliament on light pollution, for you to consider…

…and maybe sign.

Since 2008 with the BuioMetria Partecipativa project we work on protection and promotion of night sky as a resource and on awareness raising on light pollution.

Since 2013 we collaborate with various organisations in Europe on the same topics. Some of these organisations, currently active on the Stars4all project, have drafted a petition to the European Parliament, advocating a European Directive on light pollution.

With the BuioMetria Partecipativa project, in over eleven years we held almost 130 outreach events at various latitudes, obtained recurring national media coverage, conducted scientific activities, contributed to the creation of networks involving citizens, public and private sector organisations. Above all, we invited a lot of people to think about how much light (and which lights) they use. We are writing primarily to those who followed us on the events, and more in general to whoever is interested to the light pollution topic.

We encourage you to review the petition drafted by th Stars4all team. If you agree, sign it, and let us know you did (please write to bmp@pibinko.org). If you don’t agree with the petition, or you have any doubt, we would like to hear from you (again, write to bmp@pibinko.org).

 

Recommended steps

  1. Check out the full petition text
  2. Register on the European Parliament petition portal
  3. Once you have registered, log in to the petition portal, go to the petition page (look for n. 362/2018, or click here once you are logged in to go there directly) and click on the bottom right button to sign the petition.
  4. Write to bmp@pibinko.org to let us know how it went